entrepreneurship

Learning from the entrepreneurs themselves!

Add your thoughts here… (optKeron Bascombe share his experience at the ”5th Global Forum on Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship)

Tech4agri

Readers!

The 5th Global Forum on Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship which is hosted by the South African government (Department of Science and Technology) was  held in East London, South Africa, from 28 – 30 May, 2013.The Global Forum attracts around 500 – 600 business incubator managers, policy-makers, SME entrepreneurs, financiers and development agencies from all continents for a unique networking and knowledge-sharing experience. The Global Forum contributes to the “know-how” and the “know-who” in the global innovation and entrepreneurship community. Participants come to the event to be exposed to new business models, ideas and methodologies, as well as to meet people with similar interests in other countries and other industries and to explore partnerships and capacity-building opportunities.”

Fortunately thanks to the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation’sARDYIS project (Agriculture Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society), tech4agri was able to attend this event along with representative…

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Give us a breather!

The message at the FARA-led “Africa side-event” held on the 28th October 2012 at GCARD2 was about Catalyzing Innovations and Entrepreneurship for Agricultural Research and Development”

Increasingly organizations engaged in ARD are calling for greater focus on innovations and the innovations systems approach to increasing agricultural productivity, food security and economic growth. As the world focus is shifting towards innovations, so also is it focusing on entrepreneurship as a tool for promoting agricultural innovations. Initiatives that have however risen for global, regional and national discussions have hitherto failed to integrate the role of the youth as promoters of innovations and entrepreneurship.

Speaking at the event, the Executive Director of FARA and Chairman of GFAR, Prof. Monty Jones, reiterated the need for stakeholders in ARD such as ASARECA, AFAAS, RUFORUM, PAFFO, NASRO, CCARDESA, CORAF/WECARD, RUFORUM, ANAFE, CTA, CGIAR and PANGOC amongst others to work together towards achieving the common goal of agricultural transformation by aligning their efforts to the AU-NEPAD’s CAADP framework. He also agreed that currently Africa faces the challenge of aging farmers and aging scientist in agriculture.

For the youth to be engaged in agriculture, incentives need to be created to ensure that they find agriculture a lucrative and sustainable livelihood. This demands a shift in mindset and will require conceited effort at the continental, sub-regional, national and local government levels.

As the GCARD2 plenary sessions commences, we hope that youth engagement in agriculture will take center stage.

Blog post by Olawale OJO and Idowu EjereImage

The message at the FARA-led “Africa side-event” held on the 28th October 2012 at GCARD2 was about Catalyzing Innovations and Entrepreneurship for Agricultural Research and Development”

Increasingly organizations engaged in ARD are calling for greater focus on innovations and the innovations systems approach to increasing agricultural productivity, food security and economic growth. As the world focus is shifting towards innovations, so also is it focusing on entrepreneurship as a tool for promoting agricultural innovations. Initiatives that have however risen for global, regional and national discussions have hitherto failed to integrate the role of the youth as promoters of innovations and entrepreneurship.

Speaking at the event, the Executive Director of FARA and Chairman of GFAR, Prof. Monty Jones, reiterated the need for stakeholders in ARD such as ASARECA, AFAAS, RUFORUM, PAFFO, NASRO, CCARDESA, CORAF/WECARD, ANAFE, CTA, CGIAR and PANGOC amongst others to work together towards achieving the common goal of agricultural transformation by aligning their efforts to the AU-NEPAD’s CAADP framework. He also agreed that currently Africa faces the challenge of aging farmers and aging scientist in agriculture.

For the youth to be engaged in agriculture, incentives need to be created to ensure that they find agriculture a lucrative and sustainable livelihood. This demands a shift in mindset and will require conceited effort at the continental, sub-regional, national and local government levels.

As the GCARD2 plenary sessions commences, we hope that youth engagement in agriculture will take center stage.

Blog post by Olawale OJO and Idowu Ejere

THE ENTERPRENEUR UNDER 25 (EU-25) FORUM ON AGRIC-BUSINESS

On April 29 2012, fifteen (15) young men and women came together to discuss on the future of agriculture and agric-business in Nigeria.

The EU-25 is a monthly entrepreneur forum which is done over lunch where entrepreneurs under the age of 25 come together to discuss on how effectively create change positively. The EU-25 is put together by the Olusola Amusan Company (OAC).

The month of April 2012, focused on Agriculture and how youth can transform the sector. The facilators were two young farmers; Mr. Ajifola Afolabi of NETIVA Farms and Mr. Olalekan Bankole a fish farmer and a consultant with the Ondo State Government on Agric matters.

During the introduction, Moses Ogunyemi, who is a student and a poultry farmer acknowledged the growing population of Nigeria and the need for people to be feed at all times. Thus stressing the need for we the youth to take charge and transform agriculture in Nigeria.

Olalekan Bankole, a graduate of Forestry and Wood Technology and a Fish farmer elaborated on the challenges faced especially in the Agric-business in Nigeria and as it relates to youth.

Some of them are:

  • Lack of interest on the part of youth to engage in agriculture. An example was a Local Government Area in Ondo State, Nigeria, where having set up a tomato paste processing plant, the government asked that the youth in the community joins hands to work together on a tomato plantation so as to get the raw materials and the youth refused because they saw it as work for the poor. Most young ones have no passion for agriculture. They want quick money.
  • Low number of agro-based industry.
  • Inconsistent weather for arable crop farmers.
  • Need for more machineries.
  • Unfavorable government policies as it relates to accessing funds and land acquisition.
  • A large gap between Academics & Research and what happens on the field.

The group moved on to discuss some the way out. Afolabi Ajifola of NETIVA Foods shed light on how to make use of the few opportunities open to us as agropreneurs effectively such as

  • Ways to access loan from the Bank of Agriculture, Nigeria
  • Ways to get access to farm machineries to work on farm lands through the Ministry of Agriculture and other bodies and organizations.

At the end of the forum, the 15 young people agreed to the following sets ways to improve and transform agricultural development in Nigeria:

 

  • Massive sensitization of Nigerian youth on the need to get involved in Agricultural development and the benefits that comes from it.
  • Initiation of an Agroclub to aid networking of young farmers.
  • The need to be more information and opportunity conscious and make proper use of the internet for effective sensitization and information dissemination as it relate to agriculture and agric-business.
  • Creating networks and synergy among like minds to create and manage agric-businesses.
  • Acquisition of entrepreneurship skills
  • Improving our food processing skills so as to give out quality finished products.
  • The government also needs to be shown that the future of agriculture lies in the hands of the youth. And this can only be done when we defy all odds, start small and showcase our works to the government.

We thus all agreed that with proper passion, vision, persistence, networking, hard work and making effective use of information and opportunities available we truly can change our future for the better through agriculture.