agricultural

An open Letter to Agricultural Students

MY dear friend Emmie Kio from Kenya had put up this open letter on her blog. I totally agree with her and found it worth sharing with you all . Enjoy reading ..

 

Dear Agricultural students,

“Go to the University and get yourself a degree.Be grateful that you got a chance to be part of the team” . This is just one of the many statements you will encounter in your path to learning that agricultural course . 


Its these statements that will make you feel awful as to why you didn’t get that Medicine position that you so hoped to and what you never thought of choosing during the JAB selection process turns out to be what you get. Now this is what happens. Agricultural sciences have been degraded in the past often being given the last option.During the JAB courses allocation, when all  other disciplines have their fill  the remaining un-allocated  students are lumped in to the Agricultural sciences as very few students pick them as their first choice.


Well you have no choice. You go with what is written in black and white. Three weeks after commencing your studies, your classmates  will do inter-faculty transfers with a majority of them blindly escaping to Faculty of Arts, BA to be specific. They cite reasons like Economics students have the say in campus when it comes to dressing and partying. Don’t despair. You never came to school for dressing or partying reasons. You came to gain knowledge. You neighbors and some family members will also be on your neck disapproving your choice of  career, telling you how scanty jobs are in the agricultural arena.Listen to their concerns and be wise enough to settle on the best decision. And while at it, be bold enough to tell them that as farmers ………….

For without food there’s basically nothing the economist or the technology person can do. They all depend on farmers for daily sustenance. So imagine what happens when a new generation of farmers isn’t raised to replace the old one? I bet you must have read that the average age of a farmer in Kenya is above 55 years of age constituting mostly of the old and retired. So what will happen when there’s no one to continue the farming profession?We shall all starve and die, right? Or maybe manufacture our food in the laboratories.

In addition to showing that you aren’t in the scam of professions, consider Prince Williams ,the Duke of Cambridge, who chose to enroll  himself  for an Agricultural Management course at Cambridge University so as to gain a deeper understanding of  issues affecting Agricultural businesses and rural communities in the UK. And it doesn’t end there. We have  celebrities the likes of Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon and Russell Crowe all preferring to get down in their farms.
(Olawale OJO- And even D’banj in Nigeria)

“I don’t think any place of dirt anywhere in the world means more to me than this.” 
Russell Crowe


So, Why am i saying this?


Its basically to show you that you are what you believe you are. And any career is as important as you deem it right in your mind. Passion is what it takes to be what you want to be and to be gracefully good while at it and job opportunities will follow you. And that is regardless of what people will tell you about the farming career. Let it come from within you.


Enough said so,……..




Yours’ farming

E.K

You can read the original Post here

Give us a breather!

The message at the FARA-led “Africa side-event” held on the 28th October 2012 at GCARD2 was about Catalyzing Innovations and Entrepreneurship for Agricultural Research and Development”

Increasingly organizations engaged in ARD are calling for greater focus on innovations and the innovations systems approach to increasing agricultural productivity, food security and economic growth. As the world focus is shifting towards innovations, so also is it focusing on entrepreneurship as a tool for promoting agricultural innovations. Initiatives that have however risen for global, regional and national discussions have hitherto failed to integrate the role of the youth as promoters of innovations and entrepreneurship.

Speaking at the event, the Executive Director of FARA and Chairman of GFAR, Prof. Monty Jones, reiterated the need for stakeholders in ARD such as ASARECA, AFAAS, RUFORUM, PAFFO, NASRO, CCARDESA, CORAF/WECARD, RUFORUM, ANAFE, CTA, CGIAR and PANGOC amongst others to work together towards achieving the common goal of agricultural transformation by aligning their efforts to the AU-NEPAD’s CAADP framework. He also agreed that currently Africa faces the challenge of aging farmers and aging scientist in agriculture.

For the youth to be engaged in agriculture, incentives need to be created to ensure that they find agriculture a lucrative and sustainable livelihood. This demands a shift in mindset and will require conceited effort at the continental, sub-regional, national and local government levels.

As the GCARD2 plenary sessions commences, we hope that youth engagement in agriculture will take center stage.

Blog post by Olawale OJO and Idowu EjereImage

The message at the FARA-led “Africa side-event” held on the 28th October 2012 at GCARD2 was about Catalyzing Innovations and Entrepreneurship for Agricultural Research and Development”

Increasingly organizations engaged in ARD are calling for greater focus on innovations and the innovations systems approach to increasing agricultural productivity, food security and economic growth. As the world focus is shifting towards innovations, so also is it focusing on entrepreneurship as a tool for promoting agricultural innovations. Initiatives that have however risen for global, regional and national discussions have hitherto failed to integrate the role of the youth as promoters of innovations and entrepreneurship.

Speaking at the event, the Executive Director of FARA and Chairman of GFAR, Prof. Monty Jones, reiterated the need for stakeholders in ARD such as ASARECA, AFAAS, RUFORUM, PAFFO, NASRO, CCARDESA, CORAF/WECARD, ANAFE, CTA, CGIAR and PANGOC amongst others to work together towards achieving the common goal of agricultural transformation by aligning their efforts to the AU-NEPAD’s CAADP framework. He also agreed that currently Africa faces the challenge of aging farmers and aging scientist in agriculture.

For the youth to be engaged in agriculture, incentives need to be created to ensure that they find agriculture a lucrative and sustainable livelihood. This demands a shift in mindset and will require conceited effort at the continental, sub-regional, national and local government levels.

As the GCARD2 plenary sessions commences, we hope that youth engagement in agriculture will take center stage.

Blog post by Olawale OJO and Idowu Ejere

The challenge of a pro-poor agricultural research system

THE GFAR BLOG

Kenyan farmers

One of the main challenges facing Agricultural Research for Development is how to build an agricultural research system more close to smallholders. For a long time, the research was a matter of scientists practiced in laboratories with results which farmers are often unaware. Several decades after this kind of research, the challenges of poverty and hunger that the research should help to provide solutions remain, and continue to cause more damage in some regions of the world than in the past times.

According to the recent report co-published by FAO, IFAD and WFP on the State of Food Security in the World, the rate of malnutrition in Africa and some regions of Asia have increased over the last 20 years, although improvements have been observed at global level.

Thus with the complexity of the challenges facing farming systems in the future, a transformation of agricultural research systems is urgent to increase…

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