“We need a food system that works for everyone, and our planet. This is how we can do it”

“We are not going to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals for health and nutrition unless we are looking at how agriculture operates

“We need a food system that works for everyone, and our planet. This is how we can do it” @wef https://medium.com/world-economic-forum/we-need-a-food-system-that-works-for-everyone-and-our-planet-this-is-how-we-can-do-it-bb7fef135168

APPLY-GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY SYMPOSIUM 2017 – NEXT GENERATION DELEGATION

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Deadline is November 4 2016.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is now accepting applications for our Next Generation Delegation from students to participate in the Global Food Security Symposium 2017. The symposium will be held on March 29-30, 2017, in Washington, DC.

The 2017 symposium will offer key insights on how to leverage past successes, and invigorate future efforts, amidst an evolving global landscape. This unique window of opportunity is a chance to help shape the next decade of leadership on global food security.

Next Generation Delegates will have the opportunity to:

  • interact with symposium speakers and senior attendees in private forum;
  • network with other outstanding students planning careers in global food, agriculture, and nutrition sectors;
  • connect with key stakeholders from the public, private, and NGO sectors in private meetings; and
  • select delegates may also participate in symposium side events, panel discussions, or video interviews.

Rapporteurs will play an important role by attending working group “Solution Sessions” in Washington, DC, and capturing key themes and outcomes discussed at private working group sessions. The aim of this position is to allow students to participate in the working groups and the symposium and to ensure that the proceedings and outcomes are clearly recorded and shared with participants for follow-up action. The Solution Sessions will be held on March 29, and rapporteurs will also be invited to the symposium on March 30.

Candidate Responsibilities

Delegates are expected to:

  • Attend all symposium-related events in Washington, DC, on March 29-30, 2017. The Council will cover round trip airfare, accommodations, and meal expenses.
  • Prepare a commentary piece for the Global Food for Thought blog on food security, shocks to the global food system, and entrepreneurship and innovation, as it relates to their area of research focus and career trajectory.
  • Support social media outreach, which includes engaging your respective universities and disseminating information about the symposium, its featured report and the live stream to your networks.
  • Contribute to and participate in the event’s social media plans, and responsibilities as required.
  • Participate in a private post-event debriefing session and complete an online evaluation of the event.

Candidate Criteria:

Students must be at the graduate or advanced undergraduate (third or fourth year) level studying agricultural development, social entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship, or other food security related disciplines. Students must plan to enter the agriculture and food sector upon graduation. International students and students studying at universities outside of the United States are strongly encouraged to apply.

To Apply

Interested applicants should complete this application form , providing the following:

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Two professional or academic references
  • A letter of recommendation from a professor or employer
  • A brief essay (maximum 500 words) on one of the following topics as it relates to their area of study: innovation and technology in the global food system, global food security and global stability, sustainable and equitable development of food systems.

The deadline for applications is November 4, 2016. Please note incomplete applications will not be considered. If you have in questions about the Next Generation Delegation, please contact nextgendelegation@thechicagocouncil.org.

For More Information visit – https://www.thechicagocouncil.org/basic-page/global-food-security-symposium-2017-next-generation-delegation

THE ROAD TO 2030: ERADICATING POVERTY AND ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION .


adeI wrote this article for the 2016 International Youth Day and it was first published on Rural Reporter’s website

Mallam Audu works out of the agro shop smiling. He has just purchased all the input for this season’s planting and also got his 30 minutes advisory session from the agro dealer. Two thousand kilometers away, Mr Obi takes delivery of fresh tubers of yams; two bunches of plantain and a basket of tomatoes just 20 minutes after ordering from a mobile app.  The roads leading to Thai community are now well paved and the first textile factory is up and running with quality cotton supplied by farmers in the community. Aba is now home of quality textile with exports to the other regions of Africa. You might wonder, when did all these happen? The year is 2030.

Of course many will say, “These are just wishful thinking and dreams”. They are however very achievable. The role young people in Nigeria, and indeed Sub Sahara Africa, have to play to make all the above a reality cannot be over-emphasised. Little wonder then that this year’s International Youth Day focuses on three fundamental elements –eradicating poverty, achieving sustainable production and consumption by the year 2030. While a whole lot goes into achieving these, agriculture and agribusiness plays a major role. It is also one of the few sectors that can conveniently engage young people solving issues related to hunger, mal-nutrition, unemployment and ultimately food security.

THE ROAD TO 2030

Much is needed to achieve this goal it is however achievable. This article highlight 3 kick off steps needed to achieve this by 2030. It is important to note though that actions are required from now to make this reality To start with, an all inclusive stakeholder consultation is needed. This consultation will involve both public and private sector in agriculture, the farmers, youths and women, donor organizations ,research institutes, health care organization and other organizations or agency that play a role in the agriculture value chain to mention a few. The purpose of this consultation will be to have a holistic need assessment of what is needed to improve and transform agriculture. It will also be an avenue to priotize key focus areas and synergize across board on steps to take to achieve the set goal.

One of the fundamental outcomes expected from this consultation should be a clearly defined value chain transformation road map for each key commodities and agricultural services. A consultation usually ends with a long list of needs to be address and responsibilities to be shared. Due diligence needs to be done to this to ensure every one knows the role they have to play and in what areas of the sector.

It is on the basis of these that required increased investment need to be provided. The Feed Africa Report by the African Development Bank clearly stated that Africa requires US$315bn- US$400bn to realize the Sustainable Development Goals on poverty and ending hunger. It is thus imperative that consistent and purposeful effort be made to provide funding to transforming agriculture and it value chain. This should start with increased allocation of budget to agriculture and related sectors by the governments. It is also important that the government allows the private sector handle the job of running agribusiness while they focus on issues like regulation, health care, research, infrastructure to mention but a few.

Young people are dynamic and energetic. They are also not blinded to the challenges and pressures of the times we live in and as such might not be quickly drawn to engaging in agriculture as they believe that a white collar career in other sectors will provide a better life for them. Of course not every one will be in the agriculture sector. It is however important to note that more than ever before the sector needs intelligent, hardworking, smart and entrepreneurial young men and women to engage in the various aspect of the value chain. It is thus important that changing young people’s perception toward agriculture be given attention.

To succeed in this, a couple of things need to be done

  • Improving the lifestyle of existing smallholders to reflect success by helping them do agribusiness rather than just farming
  • Promoting the success of young people who are doing well in agribusiness
  • Parents and educational institutions promoting from an early age importance of growing ones food through backyard farming and school gardening
  • A joint collaboration by the public and private sector to fund scholarships to study agriculture and to provide grants and loans to young people with ideas in agriculture and agribusiness These kick off steps needs intentional efforts from all involved.

There is no folding of hands and waiting to be spoon fed. Youth, need to get involved in shaping the future they want for themselves. Join in policy discussion, partner with others in areas of interest in agriculture and agribusiness, be ready to learn and get trained if needs be. Display qualities of hard work, honesty and endurance to achieve set goals. If opportune to get funding please use wisely for intended purpose.

 

2030 is not far off from us. As a young person are you prepared to take needed steps to achieve these goals. We all should take sometime to think about this and see areas we can contribute. A little bit of effort will collectively yield good results. . – See more at: http://ruralreporters.com/the-road-to-2030-eradicating-poverty-and-achieving-sustainable-production-and-consumption/ | Rural Reporters

Plantain & Banana Stakeholders Plan Inaugural Meeting for August 13

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Over the years, Nigeria has been one of the highest producers of plantain and banana yet this noble produce has never been exported, production remained irrational as its either too much in the market at some times causing glut and wastage or very scarce at other times becoming expensive.

There is no clear policy from the government on the industry though individuals have embarked on massive campaign for increase in production and the potentials in the industry, government has played negligible role in the production, processing and marketing of the crop that has been tagged has the third staple food in the country. Cooperatives and associations on these crops are hardly heard or known.

It is out of passion for these crops and the huge potential the industry can impact on the economy of the country especially now that its struggling that this association is founded to create a new course and way forward.

The aims and objectives of this association are:

1. To organise all existing and intending plantain and banana farmers, processors and marketers.
2. To provide a forum or avenue where members can speak with one voice.
3. To set and improve the standard of production, processing and marketing of plantain and banana which are given to the public, ensure even distribution of produce and maintain fair price profitable to stakeholders and convenient for buyers.
4. To improve plantain and banana industry education at all levels throughout the federation.
5. To participate in planning, policy making and administration of plantain and banana industry at all levels of government.
6. To provide a forum whereby understanding, fellowship and unity can be achieved and maintained at all times amongst all members of plantain and banana industry stakeholders.
7. To raise the status of plantain and banana industry, seek loans, grants and incentives from government, non governmental organisations, financial institutions and international donors.
8. To extend protection:- legal or otherwise.
9. To uphold the international standard of cultivation, harvesting, processing and marketing of plantain and banana to facilitate exportation and balance of trade.
10. To affiliate with All Farmers Association of Nigeria (AFAN) and or fraternize with any other association relevant to plantain and banana industry in Nigeria and international bodies with similar aims and objectives.
11. To establish and maintain good relationship with members of the public, other commodity associations and all levels of government.
12. To establish and maintain good relationship with plantain and banana industry stakeholders in Africa, Commonwealth and other parts of the world.
13. To operate benefit schemes for the members as may be decided by the National Executive council from time to time.
So, if you are an existing or intending plantain and or banana farmer, processor or marketer, make it a date with us for the inuagural meeting of the association on August 13th, 2016.

For more inquiry call 08167434244, you can also drop your number and first name to join the whatsapp forum.

BY- Adeniyi Bunmi

First Announcement: Fifth RUFORUM Biennial Conference, 2016

#Eventworthattending
5th RUFORUM Biennial Conference

RUFORUM

3. 851 X 315 BannerDates: 17 – 21 October 2016 | Venue: Century City Conference Centre, Cape Town, South Africa

It gives us great pleasure as the Organising Committee, to invite you to the FIFTH RUFORUM BIENNIAL CONFERENCE 2016 also known as the ‘African Higher Education Week’ to take place 17 – 21 October 2016 at the Century City Conference Centre, Cape Town, South Africa under the Theme Linking Agricultural Universities with Civil Society, the Private Sector, Governments and other Stakeholders in support of Agricultural Development in Africa’.

The main objective of the Conference is to discuss strategies for strengthening the African higher agricultural education sector and linking them more closely with economic development by actively sharing lessons and experiences as well as research findings. The overall goal is to improve the performance of the agricultural sector in Africa by engaging all partners, particularly the private sector and ultimately people’s livelihoods.

The…

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ROLE OF AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPING ECONOMIES 2

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According to Wikipedia (2006) a developing society is one with relatively low standard of living, undeveloped industrial base and moderate to low human development index (HDI)

Chassy (2003) reported that 800 – 850 million people are malnourished, more than 200million of these are children, many of whom will never reach their full intellectual and physical potential, another 1-1.5 billion humans have only marginally better access to food and often do not consume balanced diet containing sufficient quantities of all required nutrients and majority of this nutritionally at risk population live in developing countries and this number will grow as human population growth is  ever on the increase. The question now is how will Agriculture carter for this pending problem of food shortage and the expected increase in nutritionally at risk people while maintaining a healthy environment and biodiversity? Will it be by expanding cultivated land area? Or by increasing the use of inputs? How friendly are these practices to the environment? It can only be achieved through crop and livestock improvements (Biotechnology) as stated by an international conference of experts convened World by the Bank, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the food and agriculture organization (FAO) in 1992.

Biotechnology has prospects to remedy the problem of food shortage as research in this field aims to develop plant varieties that provide reliable high yield, at the same or lower costs by breeding in qualities such as resistance to diseases, pest and stress factors which will contribute gainfully to food production while maintaining a healthy environment by reducing the amount of fertilizer, pesticides, herbicides used in farming. These shows clearly that biotechnology seeks to improve Agricultural practices by making it cost effective, increase productivity and bridging other gaps which pose serious challenges to Agriculture. These gains will lead to capacity building, create numerous jobs, and reduce poverty as well as ending malnutrition. Annon (2002) reported that the United Nations Economic and Social commission for western Asia Cooperation with International Labour Organization (ILO) sought to identify the best approach for regional capacity building in new  technology to improve employment rate, sustainable development and poverty alleviation in developing Arab Nations came to a conclusion that identifying new technologies, adopting, regulating and implementing them will serve the purpose for national economic and social development. In the report, it was emphasized that countries that adopt a better approach to the four novel technologies of biotechnology, genetic engineering, biomaterials and informatics will develop a better capacity for economic and social development than their counterparts.

It becomes very pertinent in this era of dwindling oil prices and mass unemployment that Nigeria incorporates biotechnology into its agricultural programme as the Present administration seeks to savor the economy by diversifying it to Agriculture which promises to be the best substitute. It should however be noted that for Agriculture to be worthwhile, appropriate technologies (Biotechnology) must be employed rather than relying on the very crude techniques that will not carter for the present day challenges posed to Agriculture e.g. Climate change, erosion and leaching of farm lands, arid and unfertile lands etc.

LIMITATIONS/PUBLIC PERCEPTION

It is obvious that to meet the food demand in a developing economy like ours using a novel technology like biotechnology requires meeting a number of social, political, economic and technical challenges.

We are thankful to the Nigerian Government for passing the biosafety bill into law, establishing the National Biosafety Management Agency; however we still experience a major problem of social acceptability, which I know is a misconception a majority of the Nigerian populace holds about biotechnology and GM products. In a survey carried out in my 4thyear in 2012, it showed that 85% of Nigerians don’t know what biotechnology entails but have their own personal philosophies in the best ways it appeals to their knowledge, and their knowledge is only associated with the negatives of biotechnology . It should however be stressed that biotechnology is a household name for everything  that has to do with manipulation of living things ranging from the very simple process of alcohol fermentation to cloning of plants and animals. It should also be known that genetic engineering; transgenic organisms are quite different from cloning and cloned organisms. It should also be known that they is no innovation that lacks disadvantages, just like cars, airplanes, electricity had  their advantages and disadvantages so also is biotechnology. Owing to the fact that the advantages of this innovations outweighs the disadvantages, policies, regulatory bodies are constituted to regulate this innovation within the confines of its advantages while on the other hand greatly reducing the disadvantages, this is no exception with biotechnology as the National Biotechnology Management Agency (NBMA) was constituted to regulate the activities of biotechnology, and they will deliver on this core objective. In criticizing biotechnology and its products, we should offer a hard-look rather than our personal philosophies as the problem of social acceptance is a major setback to the proliferation of this technology in Nigeria.

The economic and technical issues relate to funding of biotechnology researches, infrastructure for researches and manpower to put this technology into practice, since it is novel and the practice within the country is small scale. This however have discouraged individuals from venturing into this field of study as it is assumed to have very grim opportunities for its graduates and practitioners, but we have faith owing to the importance attached to this discipline that our well-meaning, experienced and exposed leaders will tap into the potentials of this discipline providing funding which will result in the training of personnel to adequately fit into this field.

CONCLUSION

Agricultural biotechnology will be a major part of the solution to the problem of increasing food demand while at the same time conserving biodiversity. It has been shown to improve yield around the world especially in developing countries and this increased yield will spare land for natural ecosystems to co-exist with agro ecosystems, improve GDP, generate income, create employments and consequently greatly reduce poverty and malnutrition which is the bane of developing countries. We implore Nigeria to join other developing and developed nations who have resorted to biotechnology on the basis of their needs and empirical based reports on biotechnology products by open minded, well-meaning scientist rather than taking queues behind developed countries who don’t have the need we have, who don’t suffer what we suffer, who have adopted the technology with respect to their own needs and claim the entire technology is not safe. We therefore call on individuals, opinion leaders, students, policy makers, authorities in the agriculture sector, private sector, sister and supporting MDAs like the ministry of information, national orientation agency, ministry of science and technology, ministry of finance, ministry of environment to partner with the National Biotechnology development agency to achieve its objectives of promoting and implementing evidence based science and technology of which agricultural biotechnology is cardinal.

You can read the part one here

Written by Opuah Abiekwen(abeikwen@yahoo.com) Graduate of Biotechnology and Genetics, University of Calabar